Regional Tastes and Dialects

Regional Tastes and Dialects

by Steve
(Somewhere On the Road)

Rock & Roll Diner

Rock & Roll Diner

It Comes with the Territory: Regional Tastes and Dialects

As you travel around the country in your RV, you will no doubt stumble upon some very interesting facts. The word “soda” is not always used for the same thing in all places and may mean a different thing to different people. That word is a good example, too: people can be people or folks, or other colorful words depending on where you are at the time. That is one of the things you miss when you travel by plane or even by bus, car or train: getting out and meeting the local people, tasting the regional foods and beverages and hearing some of the dialects that are sadly dying out in some locations or are not well known in others. A child who grows up and spends his whole life in the Midwest may never know the joys of hearing a southern drawl or the nasal intonation of the East coaster. They may only know the word “pop” for soda and “soda” for baking soda.

RV travel is more about the people and the areas you get to go through and to rather than just the destination. Anyone can get from Point A to Point B, but the fun comes in when you are getting there with a little bit of style and a little bit of a sense of wonder.

Imagine you are leaving your home on one side of the country with the aim of seeing two aunts, an uncle and an older brother along the way to your ultimate destination, your mother’s home in sunny Florida. Along the way, you can take side trips and journeys as you see fit, not tied to the schedule of a bus line, an airline or a train. You don’t have to leave at a certain time in the morning unless that is the time that you want to go. You are free to pick up and go as you choose and as you do so, you learn quite a bit about the country, the people around you and your own family.

You will get to places where the accents are hard to decipher just as your own is hard for them to understand. In very small places, they may call practically everyone to stand and gawk at you because of the way you speak. Once you start mentioning the places you have been in your RV, though, you will find that you are speaking the universal language of “me, too.” You will connect with people who are from there, have been there or have relatives living there right now.

Make friends with a local shopkeeper and they may point you to the best places to eat, sleep or visit in the area. They may tell you the most interesting sights to see. They may let you in on a little secret or two about the area. Of course, how much you believe and how much is just local lore is entirely up to you. And that is yet another benefit of RV living.

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